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The other side of Global Warming

Anyone who can think for themselves will realize that there are at least, and I mean, AT LEAST, two sides to any given argument. That’s why it’s important to consider these 7 links. They basically show another side to the near hegemonic discourse about global warming.

Image credit: NASA (via Flickr)

1- http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/apr/21/rahn-the-world-did-not-end/

2- http://www.scienceclarified.com/scitech/Global-Warming/Global-Warming-and-the-Future.html

3- http://www.dailytech.com/After+Missing+5+Predictions+IPCC+Cuts+Global+Warming+Forecast/article33457.htm

4 – http://townhall.com/columnists/johnhawkins/2014/02/18/5-scientific-reasons-that-global-warming-isnt-happening-n1796423/page/full

5 – http://www.thecommentator.com/article/2472/global_warming_just_isn_t_happening_official

6 – http://opinion.financialpost.com/2013/12/19/lawrence-solomon-for-global-warming-believers-2013-was-the-year-from-hell/

7 – http://www.thegwpf.org/nasahansen-climate-model-prediction-global-warming-vs-climate-reality/


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Is the Age of Oil coming to a close?

Image via Tumblr (Flickr)

Two very different stories about oil production in Canada…

Story 1 – http://www.ucsusa.org/clean_vehicles/why-clean-cars/oil-use/what-are-tar-sands.html

Story 2 – http://www.oilsandstoday.ca/whatareoilsands/Pages/QuickFacts.aspx

Original image credit: kris krüg http://bit.ly/1niNBQO


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Does Your Home Have A Radon Problem?

radon

radon (Photo credit: oparvez)

The following comes from a Canadian source, but it seems the Radon threat is just as bad in the US. Scientists generally agree that Radon is the second mostly likely cause of lung cancer, after smoking. The real horror, however, is that Radon occurs naturally in the soil, beneath unsuspecting homeowners. — MC

By News Canada

All homes contain some radon gas. The question is whether your home’s radon level presents a danger that can be avoided. The amount of radon gas present in your home will depend on various factors such as soil characteristics, geographic location, a home’s construction type, foundation condition, and weather.

It’s almost impossible to predict your home’s radon level based on these factors, but the good news is that a simple test can tell you if you’re in the safe zone or not. There are a number or testing kits available to the Canadian public. Health Canada recommends that the radon test performed in a home or public building be a long-term measurement for a minimum of 3 months.

Alpha Track

These detectors use a small piece of special plastic or film inside a container with a filter-covered opening. Air being tested diffuses (passive detector) or is pumped (active detector) through a filter covering a hole in the container. At the end of the test period the container is sealed and returned to a laboratory for analysis. The testing period of an alpha track detector is usually 1 to 12 months.

Electret Ion Chamber

Two versions of this detector exist: one for short-term tests of a few days or weeks and another for tests of several weeks or months. The detector is exposed during the measurement period, allowing radon to diffuse through a filter-covered opening into the chamber. Results can be read in the home using a special analysis device, or mailed for laboratory analysis. This type of detector can be deployed for 1 to 12 months.

Continuous Monitors

This detector plugs into a standard wall outlet much like a consumer carbon monoxide detector, and continuously monitors for radon. It allows the homeowner to make radon measurements in different areas of the home. After being plugged in for an initial period of 48 hours, the device displays the average radon concentration continuously. This convenience comes at a price though: continuous monitors are generally more expensive than other radon-testing devices.

Charcoal Detectors

Like most testing kits, charcoal detectors need to be exposed to home air for a specified time period. Charcoal detectors consisting of a charcoal-filled container covered with a screen and filter are exposed to a home’s air for two to seven days. They are then sealed and sent to a lab for analysis.

You can find Canadian radon testing service providers listed in the yellow pages, on the Canadian Radiation Protection Association (CRPA) website at: http://www.crpa-acrp.com/biz_directory/radon/ or on the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) website at: http://www.neha-nrpp.org/Canada_Measurement.html. You can also find out more about radon at Health Canada’s website, http://www.healthcanada.gc.ca/radon, where you can order the free booklet Radon – A Guide for Canadian Homeowners.

All homes contain some radon gas. The question is whether your home’s radon level presents a danger that can be avoided? The amount of radon gas present in your home will depend on various factors such as soil characteristics, geographic location, a home’s construction type, foundation condition, and weather.

It’s almost impossible to predict your home’s radon level based on these factors, but the good news is that a simple test can tell you if you’re in the safe zone or not. There are a number or testing kits available to the Canadian public. Health Canada recommends that the radon test performed in a home or public building be a long-term measurement for a minimum of 3 months.

Alpha Track

These detectors use a small piece of special plastic or film inside a container with a filter-covered opening. Air being tested diffuses (passive detector) or is pumped (active detector) through a filter covering a hole in the container. At the end of the test period the container is sealed and returned to a laboratory for analysis. The testing period of an alpha track detector is usually 1 to 12 months.

Electret Ion Chamber

Two versions of this detector exist: one for short-term tests of a few days or weeks and another for tests of several weeks or months. The detector is exposed during the measurement period, allowing radon to diffuse through a filter-covered opening into the chamber. Results can be read in the home using a special analysis device, or mailed for laboratory analysis. This type of detector can be deployed for 1 to 12 months.

Continuous Monitors

This detector plugs into a standard wall outlet much like a consumer carbon monoxide detector, and continuously monitors for radon. It allows the homeowner to make radon measurements in different areas of the home. After being plugged in for an initial period of 48 hours, the device displays the average radon concentration continuously. This convenience comes at a price though: continuous monitors are generally more expensive than other radon-testing devices.

Charcoal Detectors

Like most testing kits, charcoal detectors need to be exposed to home air for a specified time period. Charcoal detectors consisting of a charcoal-filled container covered with a screen and filter are exposed to a home’s air for two to seven days. They are then sealed and sent to a lab for analysis.

You can find Canadian radon testing service providers listed in the yellow pages, on the Canadian Radiation Protection Association (CRPA) website at: http://www.crpa-acrp.com/biz_directory/radon/ or on the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) website at: www.neha-nrpp.org/Canada_Measurement.html. You can also find out more about radon at Health Canada’s website, www.healthcanada.gc.ca/radon, where you can order the free booklet Radon – A Guide for Canadian Homeowners.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/wellness-articles/does-your-home-have-a-radon-problem-1961379.html

About the Author

For over 25 years, News Canada has been providing the media with ready-to-use, timely, credible and copyright-free news content. Editors, broadcasters, web and video content providers rely on News Canada for newsworthy content to effectively enhance their websites, newspapers and broadcasts. Content is made available to you, the media, in the format you need, when you need it.

www.newscanada.com


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Technology Looks to Hydrogen Fuel Cells

English: Cutaway illustration of a fuel cell car

Cutaway illustration of a fuel cell car (via Wikipedia)

By Velma Harvey

Apple has consistently set an example within the computer industry by pursuing and instituting environmentally friendly practices wherever possible. Most recently, Apple has applied for a few patents that suggest the company may be looking into using hydrogen as a source of power for future devices.

Since the creation of the first uni-body MacBook Pro, which was made from recycled aluminum and glass and contained few of the toxic chemicals present in most laptop computers, Apple has banked on its reputation for producing environmentally friendly devices.

In late 2011, Apple upped the ante, publishing multiple patents for a hydrogen fuel cell to be used in portable computing devices. According to Apple, fuel cells, ‘can potentially enable continued operation of portable electronic devices for days or even weeks without refueling.’

Hydrogen fuel cells look to be the new frontier for portable computing. Verizon already has a hydrogen powered charging device on the market called the MINIPAK, which is a pocket-sized device that uses a refillable hydrogen cartridge to produce the energy equivalent of about 10 AA batteries. If you plan to try carrying 10 AA batteries in your pocket, expect to be walking with a noticeable limp.

The benefits of using hydrogen fuel cells over the current lithium-polymer batteries are pretty compelling. Hydrogen fuel cells are lighter, can hold longer lasting charges, and can potentially be powered entirely by carbon neutral fuel sources. The byproducts of a hydrogen fuel cell are electricity and water, making it far cleaner and easier to dispose of than traditional batteries.

English: Hydrogen engine.

Hydrogen engine (via Wikipedia)

Hydrogen does have its hurdles to overcome, however. Currently, fossil fuels are used to produce most of the hydrogen available on the market. While the hydrogen and oxygen that fuel cells require can be produced through electrolysis, the electrolysis process requires an electrical input in order to work. If that electricity is produced from fossil fuels, your fuel cell is no greener than any other device you already own.

Hydrogen is also difficult to store. In its gaseous state, hydrogen takes up a lot of space, so it is usually highly pressurized in order to reach effective densities. Liquid hydrogen can store even higher densities, but it requires constant cooling, which, for portable devices, seems unrealistic. In either case, you would be carrying a highly pressurized container of explosive fuel in your pocket. This may make boarding an airplane a tad difficult. There is a lot of research being done on ways to store hydrogen in a solid state, but these technologies are not yet market ready.

One of the most exciting prospects of Apple’s investigation of hydrogen power is that they might actually pull it off. Hydrogen fuel cells are on the precipice of becoming one of the most important technologies of our generation. With Apple’s research capabilities and vast funding, it’s possible to imagine that they will provide the push this technology needs to become a real competitor with traditional energy sources. Apple has already revolutionized the personal computing industry and the music industry; maybe they can do the same for energy.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/environment-articles/technology-looks-to-hydrogen-fuel-cells-6154840.html

About the Author

Velma Harvey lives in Californa, USA and has a passion for preserving the earth and green energy products.


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Japan’s nuclear radiation is leaking into our planet

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