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Is the Age of Oil coming to a close?

Image via Tumblr (Flickr)

Two very different stories about oil production in Canada…

Story 1 – http://www.ucsusa.org/clean_vehicles/why-clean-cars/oil-use/what-are-tar-sands.html

Story 2 – http://www.oilsandstoday.ca/whatareoilsands/Pages/QuickFacts.aspx

Original image credit: kris krüg http://bit.ly/1niNBQO


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A Passion to Serve

Cosmos bipinnatus on a field of Cosmos sulphur...

Cosmos bipinnatus on a field of Cosmos sulphureus, Compans Caffarelli garden, Toulouse (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

By Meena Suresh

‘Each one of us has a moral duty to help those in need’ this is a basic lesson taught in any moral science class. There is a much deeper significance and wider perspective to this lesson.

Every individual inhabiting this planet wishes to be happy at all times. The question to be asked is why do most people find happiness in life to be elusive ?

While happiness is the birthright of every individual, often man draws boundaries around himself in his search for happiness. Happiness is perceived to be attained through the fulfillment of one’s desires and possibly the health and wellbeing of one’s own family and loved ones.

What is the reason for man confining himself and his happiness to these boundaries ?

The question finds an answer when man analyses his life from birth. By his very nature man is a free soul longing to exist without boundaries in the infinite space. However, with no choice that he can perceive, he finds himself trapped in an infant body. This infant is taught by his parents and older siblings to view them as his own. As he keeps growing, he is told that this is HIS house, those are HIS friends, these are HIS relatives, this and that is HIS…likewise these and those are THEIRS (others).

These concepts act as a double edged sword. They expand his boundaries and therefore his sense of responsibility, duties and belongingness to include perceived near and dear ones i.e. makes him grow beyond his immediate selfish / self centered notions, however they also prevent him from feeling a sense of belongingness with the rest of creation.

To what extent do participants in joint activi...

To what extent do participants in joint activities experience a sense of community? (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Some families, societies, communities and even governments foster a feeling of oneness in each growing child, instilling in him a belongingness to a wider group, community and even country.  A man who feels his oneness with all his fellow countrymen and women develops a sense of patriotism for his country. Great heroic acts of patriotism and service to their countries are done by these men and women.

Going a step beyond identification with one’s country is the identification with the world and universe at large. True teachers are those who instill a sense of belongingness by removing all boundaries which prevent man from expanding his vision to consider all of creation as his own OR to put it differently recognizing his true nature of being a free soul with no boundaries.

Such a man, finds his very being overflowing with love and compassion for all creatures of the world as they are all his very own. He feels their pain as his own. Serving others just comes naturally to such a man. Thus arises in him the very passion to serve.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/psychology-articles/a-passion-to-serve-6933672.html


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Hindus urge Netherlands to ban “Dutch Black Pete”

English: The helper of Sinterklaas. Nederlands...

The helper of Sinterklaas. Nederlands: De helper van Sinterklaas. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Special to Earthpages.org

Hindus want “Dutch Black Pete” to go.

Rajan Zed, in a statement in Nevada (USA) today, said that it was time for this negative, offensive, racist and discriminatory caricature to vanish from annual traditional festivities in cities and towns throughout the Netherlands in November-December.

Zed, who is President of Universal Society of Hinduism, argued that “Dutch Black Pete” might be a popular Dutch tradition but it appeared to be a racist throwback to the slavery era.

Rajan Zed further said that it was absolutely baffling that racist stereotypes like “Dutch Black Pete” continued to exist in 21st century world, which should have been extinct many decades ago. Was not Netherlands famous for promoting equality? Zed asked.

Portrait of Sinterklaas and Zwarte Piet.

Portrait of Sinterklaas and Zwarte Piet. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Zed urged His Majesty King Willem-Alexander and Prime Minister Mark Rutte of the Netherlands to urgently intervene to put an end to the character of “Dutch Black Pete”. Country of Rembrandt and Van Gogh which has a long history of social tolerance and which hosts International Court of Justice should not be in the business of negative stereotyping.

Zed suggested His Holiness Pope Francis to also come out with a strong statement against “Dutch Black Pete” tradition as religions were supposed to speak against racism.

A white Dutch woman as Zwarte Piet, Sinterklaa...

A white Dutch woman as Zwarte Piet, Sinterklaas’ helper. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Zed urged Netherlands to also make efforts to end frequently complained workplace discrimination.

Black Pete (Zwarte Piet) is a traditional jolly sidekick to Dutch Saint Nicholas or Sinterklaas (Dutch version of Santa Claus); dressed in a gaudy medieval costume with blackened face, thick red lips, earrings and curly Afro wig; often showed as servile, clumsy and dumb; in the annual parades and festivities in Amsterdam and other cities/towns of Netherlands. It first appeared in an 1850 book by Jan Schenkman.


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What exactly is Feminism today anyway?

Originally posted on Cynic No More:

First wave feminism I understand. Second wave feminism I understand. Once we get into the modern era of feminism, I get very confused.

What exactly does the modern feminist stand for? Can’t figure it out. I’ve read feminist blogs and they only served to confuse me more. Contradictory ideals. Comments on the blogs from women also claiming to be feminists saying the blogger had no idea what they are talking about. Still can’t figure it out.

There’s such radically different ideologies under the feminism banner. I’ve watched interviews with sex workers and pornstars. They say sex is freedom of expression. They are in control of their bodies and sexuality. They love their work, it’s a lot of fun. They consider themselves feminists. But then you’ll have other women who say that porn industry encourages objectification and violence towards women. They can’t both be feminists, can they? So who is right?…

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Earthpages gets a new Facebook page!

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Earthpages new Facebook page

There’s an old saying that success is like a snowball. The more it rolls down the hill, the bigger it gets. This has certainly been the case with my use of Facebook.

Since opening my personal Facebook page to the public, I’ve met a lot of really interesting people. People who I’ll probably never meet in person but who are open to relating through the web. Not everyone has that kind of global perspective. Some want to keep their Facebook page private for known friends and family. And I can appreciate that. But I believe the broader perspective will become increasingly normal in the future (it already is with musicians, who collaborate with like-minded souls at a distance).

It’s only a matter of time before mankind’s little boundaries get bigger. And I want Earthpages to be at the forefront of that change.

Funny thing is, as I get to know my new Facebook friends (whom I haven’t met in person), the whole bunch starts to feel like an extended family. Or maybe a circle of acquaintances. We all have common interests. And many post vital stories that I want to share with the rest of my Earthpages visitors.

But still, there’s a slight tension – I’ll be honest – with my extended circle, on the one hand, and my old friends and family, on the other hand. I have to think before posting family photos or divulging somewhat personal info. So far, I’ve managed the two realms on one Facebook page pretty well.

But it’s time to break free and start up a whole new page. And that’s why I’ve launched a second Facebook page for Earthpages. It’s quite new and doesn’t have many followers yet. But I am delighted that the search engines have picked it up.

This new page contains cutting edge stories and alternative commentary. It won’t tell you how I feel today or if I brushed my teeth after dinner! That kinda stuff will be at my first Facebook page, which everyone is still welcome to join. My new page, simply called “Earthpages“, is about what’s happening now. And what will make a difference tomorrow.

Check it out!  https://www.facebook.com/earth5569

—MC


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Hindus say minority rights ignored in Kenya’s new polygamy law

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 Special to Earthpages.org

Hindus have stressed that feelings and rights of minorities were not kept in mind when Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta signed Kenya’s marriage bill into law on April 29, which legalized polygamy.

Rajan Zed, who is based in Nevada, said that polygamy was not practiced in contemporary Hindu society. Marriage was taken very seriously as it was considered a sacred rite and highest duty in Hinduism.

Zed, who is President of Universal Society of Hinduism, points out: In Hinduism, vivah (marriage) is the most important samskar (sacrament). Married couple is looked as a complete module for worship and participation in cultural/social acts. With the marriage samskar, one thoroughly enters into grihasth-ashram (householder phase), where one can attend to the goals of dharm (duty).

Zed believes that Kenyatta should have met the leaders of Christian, Hindu, Sikh, Baha’i and other minority religions/denominations in Kenya and taken into account their viewpoint before signing the marriage bill into law.

Zed reminded Kenyatta of his “core value” to “treat everyone fairly”. Moreover, Kenya’s constitution and other laws/policies protected religious freedom and Kenya needed to protect its minorities in order to attract foreign investments.

Ethnic diversity of Kenya, described as “the cradle of humanity” which showed earliest evidence of human’s ancestors, had produced a vibrant culture. With its abundant wildlife and scenic beauty, if Kenya wants to continue attracting tourists and increase its numbers, it has to take care of its minorities and project a picture of harmonious coexistence to the world, Rajan Zed noted.


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The Joy of Statistics: Hans Rosling (BBC)

I saw this the other night on TV and really enjoyed it. Great shots of Sweden, and the quirky professor really does bring statistics to life. Not sure about his history, though. Wikipedia tells a different story. Oh well, most countries do that. Pump up their own importance at the expense of accuracy. Still, a fun video. Highly recommended. —MC

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