Hacking the mind… without technology?


Vector drawing of the five kinds of Zener card...
Vector drawing of the five kinds of Zener cards used for parapsychology research. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Backstory

After finishing my doctorate on Carl Jung’s concept of synchronicity at U Ottawa, I wasn’t overjoyed when the university library listed my thesis under the subject heading of parapsychology.

I was concerned that many years of serious study would be dismissed as fodder for fantasy fiction writers and sensational paranormal researchers.

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Also, my thesis doesn’t defend nor debunk the alleged truth of synchronicity. Instead, it offers a postmodern analysis of how Jung advances and legitimizes this fringe topic within the larger scientific community. The library might equally have listed my thesis under sociology, psychology, philosophy and religion.

Despite my initial misgivings, I came to accept, almost embrace the library listing. I’ll be an expert on parapsychology, my young enthusiastic self thought. This could be my niche!

Today, I’m neither a zealot nor a hard-nosed skeptic about parapsychology. I just want to learn more and share any discoveries for the common good.

Mind Hacks? 

Over the years I’ve come to wonder if the mind might be hacked without any direct technological link. Could a person (or spiritual power associated with that person) influence another person at a distance?

I’m not talking about the art of persuasion. That involves words, maybe images and music; some kind of physical or symbolic contact. Nor am I thinking about those headline news pundits concerned about tech interface and implant abuse.

No, I’m talking about parapsychology, just as the library suggested.

Two examples

Usually when we’re fed up with something or someone, the Jungian shadow emerges.

For example, once on social media I made a comment that might have contained some truth but also wasn’t too polite.

More recently, just before the solar eclipse I posted a headline that wasn’t terribly positive.

In both instances it was like the shadow momentarily eclipsed my usual positive attitude—a kind of ‘eclipse’ of my normal way of doing things. Almost immediately after, my total self re-emerged and I began to make amends.

So what happened? Did my mind/brain short from stress overload and accumulated resentment? Or was I hacked by a disruptive spiritual power? To me, it felt like both.

And possibly both scenarios are right. Evil could seize upon opportunities of perceived weakness in our psychological armor. Like hacker bots sensing firewall vulnerabilities, the devil might watch, wait and pounce when ready and, oddly enough, when permitted by God.

This perspective probably wouldn’t fly with most psychiatrists. And that’s unfortunate because, in my opinion, psychology and spirituality demand better integration. Not just the hopeful ‘save the world’ stuff. But also the darker, less admirable elements.

Jung believes that ignoring the shadow prevents us from mastering its powerful, collective energy, which then erupts when we least expect it.

English: Example of a subject in a Ganzfeld ex...
Example of a subject in a Ganzfeld experiment. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What do you think?

Spiritually speaking, is no woman or man an island? That is, are we all subtly linked? The light and the dark?

Or is humanity only connected through more verifiable factors like family, friends, society and the media?

I won’t say only the shadow knows but I suspect it has a pretty good idea.

 How to Live our Wildest Fantasies in the “Real World.” (elephantjournal.com)

 Embracing darkness and shadow that we might also be light and joy (beyondmeds.com)

 War games: South Korea undertakes anti-terror exercises, in pictures (telegraph.co.uk)

 Someone broke down the color psychology behind your favorite Disney characters (mashable.com)

 ‘MEET ITS TRAGIC DOOM’ NoKo says it’s ‘on standby to launch’ in new warning (foxnews.com)

 Psychological abusers don’t go for the weak – they choose strong people because they ‘like a challenge’ (businessinsider.com)

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