The humbling of the atheists: How religion survived the progress of science | National Post


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Not so long ago, there was a countercultural boldness in standing up for atheism. But religion has survived its attacks

Source: The humbling of the atheists: How religion survived the progress of science | National Post

Comment – I seem to remember reading somewhere Jordan Peterson saying he was agnostic instead of atheist. And that if he had reason to believe in God, he would do so. That seems reasonable to me. I mean, the guy appears to be honest and not faking it. If he is agnostic and not a die-hard atheist, that would make the above argument a bit flabby.

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2 comments

  1. A smart atheist would be forced to accept that the probability exists there may be a deity, and so be an agnostic. Likewise a smart deist should accept the probability a deity may not actually exist, and be an agnostic. If you believe to know the absolute truth then you are an extremist and kidding yourself. That’s my take on all this believer and non-believer hubbub.

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  2. Well, there’s also theism which does not preclude getting to know about God (and God’s workings) through revelation, grace, etc. Note I say “getting to know” and not “entirely knowing,” which might be impossible.

    I am attracted to the philosophical idea that much (maybe all) of what we take as knowledge is actually belief. To me, this can occur in ‘practical’ and ‘spiritual’ matters. That’s why I always say I believe or, more specifically, have “reason to believe” in God. If I said “I know” there is a God I would be overstepping my limits. When asked if he believed in God the depth psychologist Carl Jung once said, “I don’t need to believe, I know.” To me that is a childish statement, spiritually speaking, and Jung apparently later regretted saying it. https://steve.myers.co/jungs-regret-over-i-dont-need-to-believe-i-know/

    Actually, many people after experiencing a significant revelation say they “know” there is a God. But I think they would do well to pull back and reflect on their experience. If they did reflect, in a mature and sober way, I think they would agree with me that they have “reason to believe.”

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