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Why natural is not necessarily good but you are sacred

Dioscorides’ Materia Medica, c. 1334 copy in A...

Dioscorides’ Materia Medica, c. 1334 copy in Arabic, describes medicinal features of cumin and dill. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

By: Andy Pakula

Before I became a Unitarian minister, I was a scientist – a Ph.D. biologist. Ministry and science is an interesting combination – two fields that sometimes conflict and sometimes make for the most wonderful of synergies. I know a great deal about how living things work – about the chemistry and mechanics that life uses to sustain itself. I know a lot about how living things interact with one another.

The fact that this is in my background may make you feel that you can trust what I say about the world a bit more or it may make you feel more distrustful. The confidence we once had in scientists and science has vanished. Hostility and fear have largely taken its place.

There was a time when society was enraptured with the potential of modern technology. As we saw diseases cured that had for millenia brought human misery, there was a sense that we – through the intelligence of humanity – could be our own saviours – we imagined that our science and technology would allow us to create a world of universal peace and prosperity. The horrors of the 20th century shattered this vision as we saw our technology turned to more and more effective means of killing and oppression.

The pendulum seems to be swinging to the opposite extreme now. Science and technology are often seen as evils today. As West argues, many of us have adopted a sense that what is natural is necessarily good. Anything else is bad. The word “unnatural” has come to mean wrong, dangerous, and perverted. West would clearly like to refute this extreme notion that identifies natural as good and anything that does not occur without human intervention as bad.

So would I.

To quote author and fellow Unitarian Kurt Vonnegut “If people think that nature is their friend, then they sure don’t need an enemy.”

Vonnegut’s take is a bit extreme. Nature is not our enemy. It is filled with beauty and wonder and our tradition has long understood the natural world to contain the image of the sacred, perhaps more than anywhere else. And yet, there can be no doubt that nature is not entirely benign.

As a scientist, I learned about thousands of dangerous natural substances. One of the most potent cancer-causing agents in the world is a chemical called aflatoxin. It is not produced in some shiny chemical plant. It is not a by-product of industry. It is produced by a naturally-occurring kind of fungus that likes to grow on grain. Eating food contaminated the natural fungus that makes natural aflatoxin causes cancer.

Aflatoxin is a particularly extreme example, but it is not at all unique. Many plants, mushrooms, and animals are, of course, toxic. Even some foods we eat regularly, such as parsnips and potatoes produce their own toxins – probably as a way of protecting themselves from insects or microorganisms.

And finally, I must mention comfrey. You may know comfrey as a tall perennial plant with lovely little flowers. It is commonly used as a vegetable and made into a tea. For more than 2,000 years, comfrey has been used as an herbal medicine. It has been used to treat broken bones, ulcers, congestion, inflammation, and wounds. It is just the sort of thing that is popular today, where natural remedies tend to be trusted over something the doctor would provide. 2,000 years of experience – that has to count for something.

Well, whatever else comfrey may or may not do, it also damages your liver and contributes to the development of cancer. Comfrey is natural and it has a very long history of use. It is not, however, safe.

Synthetic drugs are tested using an incredibly exhaustive and expensive serious of chemical, animal, and human studies. Synthetic drugs are pure and guaranteed to be almost exactly the same every time you take them – no matter who makes them or which chemist you buy them from. Natural drugs are complex mixtures that can be very different in every batch. They undergo almost no testing.

I am very concerned about the natural food and medicine phenomenon. Sometimes, it is harmless to take a herbal medicine. Sometimes, though, we do irreparable damage to ourselves either because of side-effects of these natural potions or because we forgo a synthetic drug that could really help us because we have been led to be afraid of anything “unnatural.”

It is appealing to believe that natural is necessarily good. I understand myself to be a part of the natural world and I have a strong sense that all life is connected in some deep way. I sometimes find myself thinking that, because of this great communion, nature would not be in any way threatening. Indeed, it should be nurturing and restorative. It should provide a remedy for all of my ills. It is a comforting and deeply spiritual notion.

If we believe a traditional religious story of the origin of the world, God would certainly have made plants to suit our needs. In a more scientific world view, we might imagine that we would have a special relationship with plants that were around as we evolved. They might have adjusted to suit us and we to suit them. Mutually beneficial relationships do occur in the natural world. Some insects and flowers have developed such intricate and interdependent relationships that neither can live without the other! The plant could not be pollinated without its special insect and the insect would starve without its special plant.

But the reality is that we don’t benefit the plants and they did not evolve to benefit us. All of the drugs found in nature, such as penicillin, aspirin, some anticancer and cardiac drugs – are made by plants that evolved to produce them for some other purpose – usually to repel or kill some kind of invader – and we are just lucky that they have beneficial effects for us.

Just as natural materials are not necessarily good, unnatural ones are not necessarily bad. Synthetic medicines, as West points out, have extended our lives dramatically. They have literally transformed the nature of human life. Unless we are walking naked through an untouched primordial forest –we are making use of something or many things that are unnatural.

Patrick West says that we worship nature. He claims that we do so because we can no longer worship the traditional God and because we no longer trust scientists and doctors implicitly.

There is some truth to this claim. Human beings crave a simple organising principle. The world is immensely complex and becoming more so every day. Scientists and engineers dream up new things faster than we can keep track of them, much less know how to evaluate their safety. In response to such a complex and dynamic reality, some turn to fundamentalist religion and use scripture or religious dogma to help sort the things into categories that are easier to manage. Others turn to different simplifications, including the notion that nature is pure and good.

The duality of natural and unnatural is applied not only beyond us, but within us. Is the human character innately good or evil? This is a question that has been argued for centuries.

Today, a common notion has emerged that our character is intrinsically good – that it is by nature pure and true. Evil comes in only by that which is artificial and imposed upon us. As long as an aspect of our character is natural, this thinking would say, it is good.

I am reminded of when my son Jacob was very young. My wife and I were absolutely determined to keep him free from the contaminating influences of our culture’s violence and shallow values. There would be no telly in our home. The toys would all be wood – no artificial plastic stuff for this child. And most of all, there would be no weapons of any kind.

It was not long at all before our darling, pure, innocent Jacob was making anything and everything into a weapon. “We don’t have weapons in this family” we said, as we confiscated the toast he had bitten into the shape of a gun. “We don’t have weapons in this family” we said as he shaped his fingers into a gun and blasted away at us. “What are you going to do” he countered, “take away my finger?” At that point, we realised we were fighting a losing battle – not just against him, but against something that is hard-wired into us.

Human nature, I am convinced, is not purely good. Nature does not bestow upon us infinite goodness. Just as in the world beyond us, nature provides a complex mix of harmful and helpful, good and bad, constructive and destructive attributes and impulses.

It is human nature to be compassionate. It also appears to be human nature to fight one another. I believe that a sacredness, a goodness exists within each of us – call it dignity, call it soul, call it Atman, call it God – whatever you call it, it is there to be found in every heart. But the goodness is not all there is. We are innately capable of good and evil.

There will be no simple measuring stick for us to show us good from bad or right from wrong. Categories such as natural or scriptural that create simple black and white dualities will not be adequate signposts to show us the way.

Mary Oliver, in her poem, “At the Lake,” speaks rapturously of a natural event – a fish leaping through the air. She speaks of holiness and identifies it with the natural world.

The point is not the simple one that everything natural is holy and everything unnatural is not. It is more subtle. She writes:

“This is, I think, what holiness is:
the natural world,
where every moment is full of the passion to keep moving.”

The holiness of the natural world lies not in its naturalness alone, but in its motion. It is in the process of life – its exuberance and energy, its determination – that holiness is found. Goodness is to be identified in everything that shows us our unity, brings us together, creates understanding, and grows the living force of love in the world.

Dualities are for the solitary and untrusting. It is when we are alone that we must measure and determine for ourselves – when we turn to simplistic categories to guide us. It is when we can not trust others to carry out their roles responsibly that we must suspect everything and turn to simplifying dualities.

In community, we turn to one another. It is here, inspired by vision and bound together by love, that we learn what creates understanding, what creates trust, and what reveals our unity.

It is here that we begin to create the world we long to see.

About the Author:

Andrew Pakula is the Minister of the Newington Green and Islington Unitarians, a rapidly-growing, radically-inclusive, spiritual community in north London. He directs UKSpirituality.org, a not-for-profit association of quality providers of spiritual events, programmes, and workshops.

With a Jewish background and influences from many other religious traditions, his is a particularly open and eclectic approach to spirituality. Andrew believes that authentic spirituality provides a way of living deeply, meaningfully, and with connection, and that it offers an essential antidote to the busy, individualistic, materialistic culture in which we live.
http://www.ukspirituality.org
apakula@gmail.com

Article Source: Why natural is not necessarily good but you are sacred


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ISLAMIC AND JEWISH FASTING: A Holy and Spiritually Healthy Diet

By Rabbi Allen S. Maller

Lack of self discipline will soon put more Americans in a hospital than all infectious diseases combined. About one third of the of the 600,000 Americans who died from various types of cancer last year, died due to their own life style behavior. Smoking, over eating and drinking, and physical inactivity did them in. The same set of self indulgences also afflicted those who died from heart disease last year.

The lack of self restraint so evident in much of modern life leads us first to pleasure seeking, and then increasingly to self induced suffering. Americans spend billions of dollars on pills, diet books and gym memberships but lack the self discipline to restrain themselves from over eating. And young people are leading the way in increasing self indulgence. In the majority of states (30 of 50) the percentage of overweight or obese children is now at or above 30%.

In our consumer driven cultural, we have largely lost the spiritual value of self restraint that is so important in the Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Jewish and Muslim tradition. Self-restraint will be the single biggest factor influencing life expectancy in the 21st century. With self-restraint most people will have a good chance to live into their 80s or 90s.

However, indulgent pleasure seeking and lack of self restraint will increasingly cut short the lives of tens of millions of people. Almost all religions have always taught that self restraint is a virtue. Fasting and ritual dietary restrictions are the most wide spread example of spiritual self-restraint and self discipline.

The idea that people, even thin people, should restrict their culinary pleasures sounds outrageous to our 21st century ears. Dieting is hard enough. Why should we torture and afflict ourselves by fasting? Don’t most people think that being happy is the most important thing? Isn’t eating one of the most accessible pleasures we have? Why should religions restrict our pleasures? For example, why should the Torah decree a day of total denial of food and drink for every Jewish adult? (Leviticus 16:29, 23:27). For twenty-four hours Jews (over age 13 and in good health) are supposed to afflict their souls by abstaining from eating or drinking anything at all.

What we do not eat may be even more important than what we do eat. All animals eat, but only humans choose to not eat some foods that are both nutritious and tasty. Some people do not eat meat for religious/ethical reasons. Hindus do not eat beef, and Jews and Muslims do not eat pork, for religious/spiritual reasons.

On Yom Kippur – the Day of Atonement Jews do not eat or drink anything at all for twenty-four hours. Every year for the entire the month of Ramadan, Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset, abstaining from food and drink. The Qur’an says “Oh you who believe! Fasting is prescribed to you as it was prescribed to those before you, that you may (learn) self-restraint,” Qur’an 2:183. What is the Torah and the Qur’an trying to teach us by decreeing the importance of fasting? What spiritual benefits occur when we fast?

First of all, fasting teaches compassion. It is easy to talk about the world’s problem of hunger. We can feel sorry that millions of people go to bed hungry each day. But not until one can actually feel it in one’s own body is the impact truly there. Compassion based on empathy is much stronger and more consistent than compassion based on pity. This feeling must lead to action. Fasting is never an end in itself; that’s why it has so many different outcomes. But all the other outcomes are of no real moral value if compassion is not enlarged and extended through fasting.

As the prophet Isaiah said, “The truth is that at the same time you fast, you pursue your own interests and oppress your workers. Your fasting makes you violent, and you quarrel and fight. The kind of fasting I want is this: remove the chains of oppression and the yoke of injustice, and let the oppressed go free. Share your food with the hungry and open your homes to the homeless poor”. (Isaiah 58:3-7)

Second, fasting is an exercise in will-power. Most people think they can’t fast because it’s too hard. But actually the discomfort of hunger pangs is relatively minor. A headache, muscle pains from too much exercise, and most certainly a toothache, are all more severe than the pains hunger produces.

I have on occasion fasted for three days, and found that after the first twenty four hours the pain decreases slightly as the stomach becomes numb. The reason it is so hard to fast is because it so easy to stop. Food and drink is all around, and in easy reach; all you have do is take a bite or a sip.

Thus the key to fasting is the will power to decide again and again not to eat or drink. Our society has increasingly become one of self indulgence. We lack self restraint. Fasting goes in direct opposition to our increasing “softness” in life. When people exercise their will-power and fast, they are affirming their self-control and celebrating mastery over themselves. We need continually to prove that we can do it, because we are aware of our frequent failures to be self-disciplined.

The third outcome of fasting is improved physical health. Of course, one twenty-four hour fast will not have any more effect than one day of exercise. Only prolonged and regular fasting promotes health. The annual fast on Yom Kippur can, however, awaken us to the importance of “how much and how often we eat or drink”.

For many years research has shown that when animals are somewhat underfed, receiving a balanced diet at below the normal quantity for maximum physical health, their life spans were prolonged from 50% to 100%. A 20 year study of rhesus monkeys published in Science in July 2009, found that the group on a reduced-calorie diet was two thirds less likely to die from cancer, heart disease or diabetes than those fed the normal diet.

Even if people do not follow a permanent restricted diet, the annual example of a 24 hour fast keeps the issue in mind. Also with all the additives placed in food these days we need to be reminded of the advantage of eating organically. More important, since our society has wide spread problems with overabundance, fasting provides a good lesson in the virtue of denial.

Health problems caused by overeating and over-drinking are the most rapidly growing health problems in affluent Western countries.Thus going without any food, or even water, for a twenty-four hour period challenges us to think very seriously about the benefits of the spiritual teaching; less is more.

Fourth in our list of outcomes, fasting is a positive struggle again our dependencies. We live in a consumer society. We are constantly bombarded by advertising telling us that we must have this or that to be healthy, happy, popular or wise. By fasting we assert that we need not be totally dependent on external things, even such essentials as food. If our most basic need for food and drink can be suspended for twenty-four hours, how much more our needs for all the nonessentials.

Judaism doesn’t advocate asceticism as an end in itself. In fact it’s against Jewish law to deny ourselves normal pleasures. But in our overheated consumer society it is necessary periodically to turn off the constant pressure to consume, and to remind ourselves forcibly that “Man does not live by bread alone.” (Deuteronomy 8:3)

Fifth, fasting serves as a penance. Though self inflicted pain may alleviate some guilt, it is much better to reduce one’s guilt by offsetting acts of righteousness to others. This is why, for Jews, contributing to charity is an important part of Yom Kippur. The same is true for Muslims during Ramadan. Indeed, fasting that doesn’t increase compassion is ignored by God. Also, the concept of fasting as penance helps us understand that our suffering can be beneficial.

Contemporary culture desires happiness above all else. Any suffering is seen as unnecessary and indeed evil. Though we occasionally hear people echo values from the past that suffering can help one grow, or that an existence unalloyed with pain would lack certain qualities of greatness, many today seem to think that the primary goal in life is ” to always be happy and free of all discomfort.”

The satisfaction one derives from the self-induced pain of fasting provides insight into a better way of reacting to the externally caused suffering we have to experience anyway. Taking a pill is not always the best way to alleviate pain especially if by doing so we allay the symptoms without reaching the root cause.

Sixth, fasting is good for the soul. It often serves as an aid for spiritual experiences. For most people, especially those who have not fasted regularly before, hunger pains are a distraction. People who are not by nature spiritual/emotional individuals will probably find that a one-day fast is insufficient to help induce an altered state of consciousness. Those who have fasted regularly on Yom Kippur might like to try a two to three day fast (liquids permitted). It is best to go about your daily activities and devote your late evening or early morning to meditation and prayer.

Since you have already fasted for Yom Kippur the easiest way is to simply extend the fast another thirty-six to forty-eight hours. We are prohibited to fast prior to Yom Kippur; eating a good meal prior to Yom Kippur Eve is a mitzvah (religious duty), because Judaism like Islam opposes excessive asceticism.

The seventh outcome of fasting for Jews is the performance of a mitzvah (a religious duty), which is, after all, the one fundamental reason for fasting on Yom Kippur. We do not do mitzvoth (religious duties) in order to benefit ourselves, but because our duty as Jews requires that we do them. Fasting is a very personal mitzvah, with primarily personal consequences. Fasting on Yom Kippur is a personal offering to the God of Israel from each member of the family of Israel.

For over 100 generations Jews have fasted on this day. A personal act of fasting is part of the Jewish people’s covenant with God. The principal reason to fast is to fulfill a mitzvah. The outcome of your fast can be any of a half dozen forms of self-fulfillment. But simply knowing that you have done one of your duties as an adult Jew is the most basic and primary outcome of all.

Finally, fasting should be combined with prayer and the study of Sacred Scriptures (the five books of Moses specifically or Scriptural texts in general). Indeed, the more one studies, the less one needs to fast. A medieval text states, “Better to eat a little and study twice as much, for the study of Torah is superior to fasting.”

Fasting is a very personal, experiential offering. However, though study is also a personal experience, it takes place with a text and/or a teacher. The Divine is often more readily and truly experienced in dialogue with others than in solitary meditation.

Rabbi Maller’s web site is rabbimaller.com

Earthpages does not render medical, legal, financial or other professional services. Those in need of expert assistance are advised to consult an appropriate licensed professional. TOU


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How to Stop Being a Slave to Sin

By: Ric Bai

Many people don’t believe or don’t want to think about this word called sin. Sin is often associated with a spiritual or religious experience, but it’s not prejudice, it will attack anyone. Lets take a closer look at how it affects us daily.

Gravity

What does gravity have to so with sin? Well, just as an example. You can’t see or smell gravity, but try jumping off a building and you will soon find out how real it is. Sin works the same way, you can’t see or taste it, but consider where your thoughts come from.

Most times they are influenced by what you watch, see or hear, and at times they just come out of thin air, or do they.

Daily Worries

All of us has our own daily concerns. Common are finances, relationships and health. Would you ever think it’s a sin to be consumed with these thoughts? The key word here is consumed..worried.

These are tactics that sin uses to keep you occupied so that you never have a chance to discover the truth. You would never just let an invader enter your house and steal from you, right? Well, sin knows this and even though it’s stealing your life daily, sin does it undercover.

It throws economic worries at you, it creates situations of stress, it provides thoughts of infidelity, the list goes on and on. But, you get the point, things we deal with daily are though as just a part of life. Who would imagine that sin would be behind this.

Understanding Sin

To combat this you have to understand sin. The one thing you must know is sin can’t enslave us unless we allow it to. It can’t force you to hurt a loved one, it has no power to take your hand and hit someone. It’s only power over you is in your thoughts.

It’s only at this point that you can have a chance to overcome sin and break the chains of slavery. It’s hard for many to believe, but just like gravity, believe it or not, it still exists.

There are a few things you can start to do today to break out of sins slavery. But, it can only happen if you want to or your just sick and tired of the routine.

About the Author

Experience is the best teacher they say and each day we learn more.

We pass some of this on at Search With Roy, the hub of our sites. Subjects covered are diabetes, debt, divorce, to name a few. Information and answers, isn’t that what you want? This is what we love to do on the Internet, take a look.

Article Source: How to Stop Being a Slave to Sin


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Common interpretation and meanings related to dreams about trees or parts of a tree

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By Alex B

Dreaming about a tree represents a symbol related to one’s personal life and individuality of the person experiencing this vision. The shape of the tree in a dream is a subjective representation and reflection of this person’s or someone else’s, who is very close to the person, life situation and personal existence with relation to other people’s lives.

A tree in a dream, depending on its kind and state can be a symbol carrying a lot of meanings, both positive and negative, which can be describing dreamer’s body conditions and state, indication about health and physical wellness, ability to grow both physically and intellectually, personal achievements and progress with work as well as connection to the genealogical tree and immediate family or predecessors.

A tree in a dream can also be a representation of how studying and acquiring knowledge is progressing and even how they might affect the life of a person who happened to dream about this symbolic image. It can equally be a simple way for subconscious mind to tell people about their life course and reflect their direct or indirect relationship with others around them (these meanings will largely depend on in what conditions a tree was growing and what kind of a tree shape it has been seen: large, small, a tree with stunted growth, a perfectly shaped or a dwarf tree, a dry or a dead tree).

Tree branches seen in a dream are a symbol of hidden abilities and secret desires or aspirations. Some sources describe dreaming about a tree trunk as an indication of problems related to the dreamer’s spinal cord and basic health conditions which need to be looked at more closely or with more attention. Upper branches and canopy of a tree in a dream point out our connection to the outer space , ability to express ourselves spiritually and find ways to be able to deal with everyday life while relying on a higher levels of cognition and striving for balanced and self-fulfilling future.

Tree roots in a dream are usually what they symbolize in a wake life, they represent basic needs for our existence, connection with ancestors and inner urge to care about humankind or certain people we communicate with on a everyday basis (family, close friends, co-workers or relatives). Tree roots can also be a sign or financial stability and independence, propensity to accumulate wealth and provide for our family.

Tree leaves with all their various shapes, colors and sizes and depending on what state they were seen while dreaming represent subconscious concerns and worries related to personal private life, something we have been going through recently and our current state of consciousness. It is important to note here that even small details in a dream related to tree foliage can affect interpretation of its meaning and help to uncover positive or negative message these dreams may contain.

The overarching meaning related to dreams about trees can be described as development and growth in time, either for an individual or for relationships and personal connections this individual creates in his or her personal life with other people. Some dream interpretation sources make reference to dreaming about a ‘universal’ tree, an entity which represents the universe we exist in and which carries a special meaning when our mind tries to grasp the fact they exist and learn more about cosmic forces or objects in space which perplex and astonish us by their magnitude.

Lastly, dreaming about trees under certain weather conditions or with seasonal patterns can also reveal a multitude of interpretations and symbolic meanings. Many dream interpretation sources describe dreaming about healthy trees with lush foliage as a sign of personal wellness and material wealth, while dreaming about dry trees stripped of foliage signify times of loneliness and hardship. Depending on a season (winter, summer, spring, autumn), dreams about trees are interpreted as symbols related to the beginning of a new relationship or exciting and fulfilling career or less promising or inspiring outcomes, such as periods of hard work and the need to choose priorities in life in order to succeed or being able to handle many things simultaneously.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/mysticism-articles/common-interpretation-and-meanings-related-to-dreams-about-trees-or-parts-of-a-tree-6772421.html

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Looking for instant interpretation of your dreams? Try our Instant Dream Interpretation engine with thousands of descriptions of what your…


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The brain and the gut are more connected than you’d think

Intuitives, shamans and mystics have known for many years that the brain is not the entire person. While psychiatrists tend to focus on the brain, this can be misleading. The human being is a whole person, to include body, soul and a relationship with God.

To exclusively focus on the brain seems superficial to some, dangerous to others. Luckily, however, modern research is beginning to realize the inadequacy of purely brain-based psychiatry. Last night I saw this video with author David Perlmutter:

http://tvo.org/video/213114/david-perlmutter-belly-and-brain

At first glance I thought Perlmutter was just another new age, health huckster who will say or do anything to peddle his book. But once he began to speak, I realized he was an intelligent, articulate proponent of the idea that the brain and the gut are intimately connected.

Dont get me wrong. I agree that the brain is crucial. But it’s not alone. It’s part of a total organism located in a physical, social and spiritual environment.

—MC


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Healing the wound(s) within the Heart Chakra

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© Angela Ohlman

You are wounded. There are lifetimes of worry, fear, doubt and seeds of darkness planted within your heart centre. Day by day these wounds are grounded in today’s actions, beliefs, doors and windows within each dimension of self you visit, moment to moment. Each one connecting to the next, creating of tapestry of life extended from the wound. Dreams, desires and the endless well of faith, abundance and eternal joy… flow beneath the wound, around it, seeping out in trickles, confusion and chaos.

The wound can be one or many, fresh or old, clean or pungent, male or female, whole or hole. This energy has gained hold and only you can offer its’ release. You must explore the many hallways and doors that lead to deep within this wound. You must be willing to hear your own cries and screams for justice, for revenge and to see the shadow this wound has cast.

Delve within your most inner hurts and there you will see the mirror. The mirror shows your role, your mis-perceptions, your amour, your open wound that you work so hard to hide from the world, deny to yourself, that you protect and seek revenge for. This wound is real, alive, seeping and ready for love.

You must be willing to walk the hallways, to open new doors, to peer within with an open mind, an open heart and be a witness to the path you have been walking. To look beyond the hurt and see what caused this wound, what has been feeding it, what protection is coving your vulnerability and pain? Others will remove the scabs but the wound itself is for you to acknowledge, accept, love and replenish with what it is you desire for your highest self and your relationships with those around you; your tapestry, your life.

The wound is merely a reflection of lost power, or what we have given to others, of what we run from. Once inside you may loath the parts of yourself that lashed out, that screamed for attention, that caused addiction or whatever other blessings are whirling within your storm, the hidden, the forgotten and the despised. Hate and pain are merely the illusions that keep us from finding our wounds and creating again.

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Once you surrender to this space…. There is a shift. Your psyche awakens. You meet it, face it, acknowledge it and look for places to heal within it, remove the swords that caused it, release those that you trapped and set yourself free from the guilt, shame, sadness, hurt and pain that was holding you captive. You release the shackles. You simply let go. You can move beyond the pain, replace, heal and retrieve the goodness that was swelling below it. You look around and see the chaos has vanished; there is a clean slate and a rebirth about to take place. You are renewed, revived and full of life.

This is a blank slate, a new garden to create, you realize there is more than just hope, there is an open heart to love, to paint, to create and sing with the joy for whatever your soul truly desires to create from. The calm is beyond the storm, the wound has healed, and the wholeness is satisfying, full, flowing and the tapestry is endless, bountiful and abundant with peace. Everyone is free. You have loved yourself completely, healed your wound, released the past, opened yourself to a new flow, a garden of opportunity and a Truth that only your heart will hear. Take those wings and fly.

About the Author

Angela Abundance – loveheals.ca

Angela is an energy intuitive, psychic medium and spiritual teacher.   She will gracefully guide you closer to WHO you truly are at the…

 


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Spiritual Marriage

Originally posted on New Heaven on Earth!:

A Ketubah in Aramaic, a Jewish marriage-contra... Image via Wikipedia

What is spiritual marriage? I believe it is helpful to begin by defining marriage itself. According to Merriam Webster dictionary marriage is “a) the state of being united to a person of the opposite sex…in a consensual and contractual relationship recognized by law, b) the institution whereby individuals are joined in marriage, and c) an intimate or close union. (The photo to the right is a Ketubah in Aramaic, a Jewish marriage contract that outlines the duties of each partner)
The definition of marriage has been in the news concerning whether homosexual marriage should be made lawful. There is much more to marriage than meets the eye and controversy takes focus away from the Truth of holy matrimony and the deeper, spiritual meaning that is only discerned by communion with the Spirit of God.

Marriage, according to the Dictionary of Symbols by Chevalier & Gheerbrant, is the…

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