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Thoughts on Inter-dimensional Intelligences (Part 1)

Originally posted on Shamagaia:

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A lot of people have been connecting with me in recent weeks seeking clarity on the nature of inter-dimensional intelligences, so this seemed like a good time to whip together a little insight on some of the ones that I have encountered.

It’s hard to put experiences with inter-dimensional intelligences into words. Referring to something like Jungian archetypes is a start, but it only seems to get us so far. In this sense we at least have a paradigm from our side of the veil to relate to such things, because some inter-dimensional intelligences can reflect elements of our psychic condition, but there are others that seem to express a definite independent sense of being and motivation. So if we decide to relate to such intelligences as an extension of our own conciousness reflected in a higher dimensional source that’s fine, because we can at least start to contend with…

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Taboo words…


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Near Death Experiences


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What Is Spirituality And Its Meaning

English: A woman walking a prayer labyrinth

A woman walking a prayer labyrinth (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

By john johanson

Spirituality can be termed as a process of self metamorphosis either in a manner confirming with conventional religious paradigm or aligned with personal experience and psychological development dissociated from any religious context. In a more general way of things, spirituality may imply any sort of purposeful act or a delightful experience. There is no definition for spirituality that is carved in stone. It is a subjective topic that is disposed to personal opinions.

There are plenty of spiritual books online that present their readers with a unique opportunity to delve deep into the world of spirituality and understand its various meanings. These online spiritual books are a great resource for readers to bask in the wealth of knowledge that has the power to enlighten even the darkest corners of our minds and soul in a manner no other thing can. Knowledge is the ultimate aphrodisiac that can stimulate even the more sterile minds.

In earlier times, spirituality and religion were considered interconnected. As the society altered itself to the changing times, the prudish moral climate gave way to a more liberal and tolerant social atmosphere and the meaning of the word spirituality also changed. The concept of spirituality alienated itself from the ideas of religion. This new found meaning of spirituality was based more on a subjective approach.

Cortona, Rome, Florence

Cortona, Rome, Florence (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The difference between spiritualism and religion was discerned with greater conviction by the modern day world. The upsurge of secularism also spurred this modern day approach towards spiritualism. The people developed a broader perspective that was built around logic and rational thinking. This novel perspective conveys the belief that a spiritual experience is the nucleus of spirituality. This particular notion has been much hyped by the western culture. Spiritual experiences may incorporate being in touch with a greater reality, resulting in a more complete self.

This self metamorphosis ensues in evolution of a kind. We evolve spiritually and our spirit is subjected to liberation from mundane worries. The fast pace of the modern day world demands a lot out of us. This incessantly demanding nature of our lives leaves us with no time to think and ponder about our inner being. We often forget that we as human beings have a specific purpose to our existence and that purpose can only be found by exploring our inner self, our spirituality. We need to acknowledge the fact that only by exploring our inner self; we can lend purpose and context to our otherwise meaningless struggle to exist.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/spirituality-articles/what-is-spirituality-and-its-meaning-7216287.html

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Random Mutations?

An example of simulated data modelled for the ...

CMS particle detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Two protons collide, producing two jets of hadrons and two electrons. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

By Ernie Fitzpatrick

I subscribe to the theory that one can now where they are going if they don’t know from whence they have come. I do not accept the theory that the earth was created in seven literal days one October day in 4011 BCE. Not do I embrace the theory that we are the result of some random mutation and therefore going nowhere or having no control over where we might be headed.

As the sage had warned us, “If if don’t stop going where we are headed we will wind up at that place”.

Newtonian and or conventional science tells us that how we got here was from some mysterious BIG BANG that happened 14 billion years ago. The Large Hadron Collider will supply us with the more detailed answers if we can ever keep that project on line and not blow up CERN and the rest of the world before then. But until then, the best that the scientific community can tell us is that through billions of years of gradual evolution driven by random mutations and genetic accidents, we have thus arrived at where we are today.

And people believe this Darwinian dribble?

If evolution of you and I is driven by random events what hope do we have about the future? Can anyone predict the future? But, if Consciousness is more of the answer to life than matter, we have a totally different ball game to be played here on earth and within the universe. We are consciousness and as we become aware and awakened to what that means we increase our ability to change the direction that we are going. We can be far more than we are because in reality we ARE more than we ARE!.

I am not an accident!

We are not here by accident and if there is a message in the Mayan calendar, the Mayans, and other indigenous cultures, it is that they KNEW, that they were CONSCIOUS, and they were privy to more of who they WERE than we today comprehend. It’s not just about technology and intelligence but about the “opening of the head” to the reality of our being. And as more and more come to that awakening, the future now becomes what it is that WE SAY.

The question is will be AWAKEN before we kill ourselves?

About the Author:

As a spiritual-futurist, I have a BA degree majoring in history. One cannot know the future without knowing the past which holds clues to what is on the horizon. The world is in such a rapid expansion of knowledge that we are close to entering a tipping point that will forever change earth as we know it.

Article Source: Random Mutations?

 

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The Greenman, The Empress, Little John and Indy Jones: Untying a Celtic Knotwork

Originally posted on Shamagaia:

celtic-animal-ornament

illum_recently I experienced some very vivid psychic impressions during a lucid dreaming experience. One in particular had me receiving images of the Celtic symbolSerpiente_alquimica of the Greenman, and leading a Druidic prayer ritual in a stunning forest grove. I suspect that it might have been a peek through the eyes of ancestral memory, or perhaps a hint of things to come. Cyclically speaking, it might even be one and the same event: a past and future imposed upon one another, linked acausally by reoccurring astrological conditions of the sort expressed Alchemically by the Ouroboros snake eating it’s own tail. One things for sure, I will be doing a lot more research into Celtic lore!
The timing of this experience was telling. It was the night before my dear, departed Grandad’s RWS_Tarot_03_Empressbirthday and the week previously, I had recieved a very clear psychic image of a Tarot card with a…

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Mysticism and Sainthood – Part 2 – Mysticism, Science and Politics

Luke Gattuso – Rosicrucians – The Science of Mysticism via Flickr

By Michael Clark

To continue from Part 1,  it’s simplistic to say that all forms of mysticism are identical.

They may seem the same to some. But, by way of analogy, people with a tin ear can’t tell the difference between the Beatles and the Bee Gees. In practically every field of human activity we find experts and novices. Experts usually discern differences, great and small, in their subject matter while novices tend to miss them. Why would mysticism be any different?

Rev. Sidney Spencer says,

Before we can fruitfully generalize, we must know something of the different forms which mysticism has assumed through the ages.¹

Having said this, the following is not a comparative study. Readers looking for a good comparative analysis should take a look at Spencer’s book, Mysticism in World Religion (1963).

One could spend a lifetime researching and writing about comparative religion, something I don’t feel called to do. So this post will be limited to a select few Catholic saints and laypersons deemed to have lead holy lives.

Science and Mysticism

Contemporary researchers and skeptics often try to scientifically test the claims of mystics. But choosing a scientific methodology appropriate to mysticism isn’t easy. Science, itself, takes several forms and is variously defined.

Many theologians, for instance, believe that theology is the Queen of all Sciences – a “master science” – because its truth claims originate from God.

Clinical psychologists, on the other hand, tend to emphasize controlled experimental models that involve hypothesized cause and effect, correlation and statistically based predictions.

And, as noted, some philosophers and postmoderns spend untold hours questioning just what science is. Some, like Michel Foucault, tend to see science as nothing more than a modern myth, a discourse created and perpetuated by power.

From this, it seems the best approach for putting interior perception to the test would to combine several models—psychological, medical, sociological, philosophical and theological. Some attempts have been made to move things in this direction, most notably the work of C. G. Jung. But nothing has really become mainstream. Not yet, anyhow.²

"It is love alone that gives worth to all...

“It is love alone that gives worth to all things.” – St. Teresa of Avila (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Saints Speak

My article Krishna, Buddha and Christ: The Same or Different? touches on the idea of universal salvation. Universal salvation suggests that hell isn’t eternal or, in some instances, that hell doesn’t exist.

Believers in universal salvation generally say that even cruel, perverse tyrants immediately (or eventually) enter into heaven along with those decent folk who’ve lead good lives.

This can be an intellectually attractive idea. After all, who really likes to think of souls suffering an eternal hellfire?

But after reading the diaries of Catholic saints and holy persons like St. Faustina Kowalska, St. Teresa of Avila, Sister Josefa Menéndez and the Blessed Anne Catherine Emmerich, among others, one might become skeptical of universal salvation.

These mystics relate their interior visions, which apparently reveal the state of souls on Earth and of souls in the afterlife. Some souls on Earth are inwardly seen as holy and deserving of heaven. But others are trapped within the snares of the devil and doomed to hell unless they repent and change for the better. These mystics also speak of souls residing somewhere between these two extremes. So-called “lukewarm” souls commit various venial sins, such as gossiping or indulging in dishonorable desires. And after death they will undergo purgatorial purification, which itself is no party but, at least, temporary.

These saintly, mystical perceptions are not always oriented towards others. St. Teresa of Avila, for instance, had a vision of a nasty spot in hell where she, herself, would apparently end up in if she didn’t change her ways. Teresa was very frank about her personal battle with evil. In her autobiography she recounts an incident where “my good angel prevailed over my evil one.”3

Josepha Menéndez had regular visions of the horrors of hell, visions which could only be described as disturbing.4

Anne Catherine Emmerich had interior perceptions of ordinary people who were saints, strategically placed by God near centers of great sin and corruption. According to Emmerich these unrecognized saints suffered dearly for others around them, calling to mind the two related ideas of intercession and the taking of sin.

Modern Catholics have picked up on this with the notion of “victim souls.” However, it seems that some fanatics use this as a crutch to make themselves look better than they really are, or as a kind of denial of their own shortcomings. It’s far more attractive for some to blame personal suffering on other people’s sins than to ask themselves what they are doing wrong.

English: Saint Faustina Polski: Św. Faustyna K...

Saint Faustina Polski: Św. Faustyna Kowalska (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Polish Saint Faustina Kowalska, currently favored in Catholic circles, claimed to inwardly perceive and intercede for others in spiritual distress. She often suffered and prayed for, she writes, for other people located at a significant physical distance.

Critics of mystical diaries like Kowalska’s contend that Catholic copyists or editors probably added and deleted passages to conform to their Church’s teachings about the eternity of hell. The grand ideological scheme of the Church, critics say, would encourage clerics to meddle with autobiographical texts. In their minds this would be a justified means to an end—a “necessary sin.”

This, of course, is possible but seems doubtful, especially with the more recent saints like St. Kowalska.

The original handwritten pages of St. Kowalska’s diary are available for public scrutiny and not all that she writes about clerics and her religious sisters in the typed and published Divine Mercy Diary is complimentary by any stretch of the imagination. Faustina tells how her religious superiors regularly checked her bedsheets to make sure, so she implies, she wasn’t masturbating or having wet dreams. And she does this humorously, making her sisters conform to the old stereotype of the repressed and suspicious nun. She also tells of impure priests who aren’t worthy to hear a full, uncensored confession.

If covert editing was condoned to put a nice gloss on the Church and its often challenged teachings, why wouldn’t the alleged backroom editors have removed this unflattering material from St. Kowalska’s Diary?

Other critics rightly note that the religious diaries of saints would have been read by a Superior and ultimately by the Catholic hierarchy. The saints, so their argument goes, had to appease the known and imagined biases of their religious superiors, so wrote accordingly.

A good example of this might be found in the medieval saints’ intense disdain for women:

If God loves men and women equally, the critics contend, why would a leading mystic like St. Teresa of Avila – who apparently saw through the veil separating heaven from mere worldly appearances and social conventions – write about her female inferiority?

It is enough that I am a woman to make my sails droop: how much more, then, when I am a woman, and a wicked one?5

Did Teresa really believe in gender inequality or was she just conforming to the prevailing chauvinism of her times?

The idea that saints tailor their writings to please Catholic authorities could also apply to those passages describing the nature of heaven and hell.

Proponents of this view maintain that the medieval saints knew full well they would be risking a fiery death at the stake if they contradicted the Church’s teachings, enforced by the Holy Inquisition.

In a nutshell, some believe that saintly discourse was not just spiritually but also politically motivated. And who knows. In some instances they may be right.

¹ Sidney Spencer, Mysticism in World Religion (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1963: Preface)

² In Intuition and Insight: Toward a Practical Theory of Knowledge I made a rough attempt to develop a working method to assess truth claims derived from interior perception, and to understand some of the factors that could contribute to error. This was an ambitious and daunting task, and the piece is currently in revision.

3 Follow this link » The Life of St. Teresa of Jesus and search for the relevant quotation.

4 http://goo.gl/oi5VBa

5 Follow this link » The Life of St. Teresa of Jesus and search for the relevant quotation.

Part 1 – One or Many? | Part 3 – coming soon…

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