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I wouldn’t call this a synchronicity but it was convenient…

The day after I did my spoken piece about Carl Jung, it just so happened that “synchronicity” was the next topic for updating at earthpages.ca. I wouldn’t call that a synchronicity because the podcast also dealt with Jung’s views on UFOs. But heck, it was convenient. I was totally primed to update the entry because I’d been talking about it the day before, browsing through my PhD thesis, and so on.

I like the way the written entry came out (tweeted above). The podcast, however, sounded a bit rambly the next day. However, I won’t let that stop me. Practice makes perfect and I’ll keep extemporizing until I get good at it. One thing’s for certain, talking into a mic live has given me a whole new appreciation for people like Don Lemon, Nancy Grace, and many others. We don’t realize how good they are until we try it ourselves!


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IBM might soon be synonymous with “cool futuristic” computing again

For the past few years, the idea of quantum physics has mostly been within the purview of research scientists and New Age pundits. But more recently, we’re seeing a practical application where the conventional “bit” in computing is surpassed by the quantum “qubit,” which isn’t bound by the traditional laws of binary processing.


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Online demonstration of Carl Jung’s “synchronicty”


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Steve Hammons talks about spies, weird science and journalism


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Science gets a new picture of the quantum world

Yet another view of the quantum world. Finally, some scientists are realizing that we’ll may never know how it “really” looks. The shift seems to be moving toward, “what’s the latest picture we have?” I think that’s a far healthier approach than that of some researchers who, rather arrogantly, make sweeping claims on the basis on the latest observations and resultant theories.


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“A Brief History of Time” by Stephen Hawking

Stuff Jeff Reads

BriefHistoryTime

This book has been on my list for a while and I finally got around to reading it. I had high expectations for a couple reasons. First off, I am fascinated by theoretical physics. Wormholes, black holes, quantum mechanics, string theory, all that stuff I find intriguing. But more importantly, as a technical writer, I am very interested in how other writers of scientific and technical information are able to present complex ideas in a manner that is digestible for the lay person. From this perspective, Hawking excels in communicating deep and complicated ideas in a clear and concise manner that we commoners can grasp.

There is a lot of deep information and I could not do the book justice by trying to summarize it. So instead, I will cite a few quotes that sparked some thoughts and questions for me. The first one concerns event horizons associated with black…

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A good, all-round book on the paranormal, parapsychology etc.

English: Hand-colored photograph of Carl Jung ...

Hand-colored photograph of Carl Jung in USA, published in 1910. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I don’t know how I missed this survey-style book while doing my doctorate on Carl Jung’s concept of synchronicity. Looking through Daimonic Reality today, I was stuck by how it mirrors many of the ideas I’ve been interested in for almost three decades.

Harpur’s commentary may not be stunning but it’s above average.

The author seems a bit hard on Jung, especially in regard to synchronicity. Harpur says that Jung still adheres to an “inner” vs. “outer” worldview. And that his views about the acausality of synchronicity retain a “whiff” of mechanism because for Jung synchonicity is “organized” by an archetype (p. 155).

I picked up on this causality/acausality issue in my Ph.D. thesis on synchronicity (see Synchronicity and Poststructuralism pp. 162-163). But I cut Jung a bit more slack because I felt he had a difficult job to do, talking about synchronicity from 1928- 1961. Back then, Jung had to choose the right words and categories to be effective. So I think he was a bit of a postmodern, “selling” his concept to a largely skeptical audience. If we view it that way, Jung wasn’t so much limited or confused but rather, pioneering and shrewd. — MC