DO NOT TAKE GOD’S NAME IN VAIN | Rabbi Allen S. Maller | With Introduction by Michael Clark, PhD.

Several ideas came to mind as I read this engaging piece by Rabbi Allen S. Maller. First, what constitutes using God’s name in vain arguably is a matter or debate in itself. For instance, in a previous post were I relate that I occasionally talk to God in a humorous way about the beauty of… Read More DO NOT TAKE GOD’S NAME IN VAIN | Rabbi Allen S. Maller | With Introduction by Michael Clark, PhD.

What’s the Right Way to Correct Someone Who’s Wrong? | + Opinion

New research on false memory suggests what to do when the facts are at stake. Source: What’s the Right Way to Correct Someone Who’s Wrong? Opinion: This is a pretty basic article. Psychologists have known for decades that memory is reconstructive. Over the years I’ve come up with my own theory about truth and error,… Read More What’s the Right Way to Correct Someone Who’s Wrong? | + Opinion

Practicing your religion is healthy for both body and your soul | Rabbi Allen S. Maller | With Introduction by Michael Clark, PhD

Here’s a new article by Rabbi Allen S. Maller. Ironically, I read this excellent piece while sitting in Church (photo right). I had been suffering from a body/soul ailment of some mysterious type. Sometimes I’m not sure if my discomfort is based on physical, psychological, spiritual or some combination of those three factors. Yesterday was… Read More Practicing your religion is healthy for both body and your soul | Rabbi Allen S. Maller | With Introduction by Michael Clark, PhD

Spirituality Has Long Been Erased From Art History. Here’s Why It’s Having a Resurgence Today | artnet News | + Opinion

Spiritually-minded artists were deemed silly in years past, but now it’s a serious area of inquiry in art institutions. Source: Spirituality Has Long Been Erased From Art History. Here’s Why It’s Having a Resurgence Today | artnet News Opinion: This is a well-researched piece about spirituality in art. However, one thing I noticed was the… Read More Spirituality Has Long Been Erased From Art History. Here’s Why It’s Having a Resurgence Today | artnet News | + Opinion