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Review – Secret Societies and Sacred Stones: from Mecca to Megaliths (DVD)

Courtesy: Reality Films

Title: Secret Societies and Sacred Stones: from Mecca to Megaliths
Genre: Conspiracy, History, Occult
Production Company: Reality Films

We tend to make a distinction between organic and inorganic substances. Not too many question this. On the chemical level, the difference between organic and inorganic materials gets pretty complicated. Some inorganic materials, for instance, transform and become organic after entering an organism.

In the everyday world of things we can see without the help of high-powered microscopes, anything that eats, passes waste and reproduces is called organic. Inorganic materials aren’t as dynamic as organic compounds. So conventional wisdom tells us that organisms are alive, while inorganic things merely exist devoid of consciousness.

With these kind of cultural assumptions under our belt, we merrily blast out rock obstacles to build roads and bridges without feeling the slightest bit guilty. We’re not really hurting anything. Rocks just are. They don’t have pain receptors and don’t cry out when blasted sky high.

At least, that’s what we think. Another Reality Film, Apocalypse 2012: The World After Time Ends, puts forth the opposing idea that the entire Earth is alive (read my review).

Secret Societies and Sacred Stones is the perfect follow up to Apocalypse 2012. It outlines some of the unconventional beliefs informing the idea that the inorganic realm is truly alive.

But before I get into the specifics of this DVD, I should mention two things that those familiar with subatomic physics will already be aware of.

First, the centuries old distinction between matter and energy is hopelessly outdated. Second, inorganic substances, like rocks and stones, don’t just sit there. Inorganic material vibrates. We can’t normally see, hear or feel the vibration because it’s subatomic, and must be measured with a high-tech instrument.

And maybe I’ll mention a third thing. I’m going to tell a little story about myself. A story that happens to be true.

When I was a teen my parents owned a place in Georgian Bay. It was an old summer cottage built on the Precambrian rocks that are known as the Canadian Shield. These rocks are more than ancient. They’re literally billions of years old.

The Precambrian rock floor at Georgian Bay

One day at the cottage – and I can’t remember why or how, but I do know that I was completely sober – I suddenly had an intuitive flash. Sort of like a minor epiphany. But this wasn’t about God. It was about the island on which the cottage stood.

I saw it all in a completely new light. The rocks underneath me, extending out several hundred feet to the waterfront, were vibrating and alive with an incredible, vital energy. I believed that I saw those rocks as they really were. Not how we see through the eyes but, rather, through the soul.

It was awesome. Afterward, I went outside and stood barefoot on the rocks. I was overjoyed. Looking at the small black ants busying themselves on the rock surface, I realized that they were the same stuff as the rocks, just more organized (today I’d say I believed instead of realized they were the same stuff, only because I’ve had many more years to think about these kinds of things).

If I hadn’t had this experience, I probably would have thought that the ideas in Secret Societies and Sacred Stones were flaky. But I don’t take such a simplistic approach any more.

So that experience, combined with the findings of subatomic physics, has given me an open mind to appreciate what this DVD has to offer.

Secret Societies and Sacred Stones is a useful compendium of all things mineral and immaterial. It compels us to question the age-old distinction between animate and inanimate reality. It does this by delving into a broad array of topics which, so it suggests, are intimately related.

Underlying the film is the notion that stones have power. And this power was known to ancient cultures, including the Egyptians. Sometimes the power was good. Other times bad.

To ward off evil, stones like lapis lazuli, emeralds, and turquoise were used, sometimes as amulets and other times as ceremonial objects. Stones also had the power to sing. This idea is not only biblical (Luke 19:40) but is also found in Gnostic secret societies.

Stones could also be used for darker purposes. The film tells of failed Kabbalists whose intention isn’t pure and, like Darth Vader, are eventually consumed by the dark side. These Faustian reprobates use stones to try to control people, nature, spirits and wandering souls. It seems the stone acts as a kind of amplifier for their own darkened minds.

Again, I might have found this hard to believe. But, and to add to my own story, I brought a palm sized stone home with me before our Georgian Bay cottage was sold.

I first went to Georgian Bay as a baby. Born in May, my parents took me to the cottage for the May 24th weekend, which is a big deal in Canada. So I was just a few days old when first exposed to the rocks, pines and clear blue waters of the Precambrian Shield. And I walked barefoot on those rocks every summer during my childhood and teenage years. So the connection is deep.

And now, when the time is right, if I pick up that Precambrian stone in the city, I can inwardly see and feel the whole summer scene at Georgian Bay. It all comes back, almost as if I’m holding some kind of magical audiovisual recorder.

So yes, I do believe that stones can open doors to the unknown. But mind you, my only experience with them has been positive.

Whether or not God gives me certain memories when I hold the stone, or whether the memories are facilitated by the stone itself, I cannot know. But the memories do come. And in 3D.

Along these lines, Secret Societies and Sacred Stones tries to link up the inner technology of Kabbala, the pseudoscience of alchemy, and the modern science of chemistry. As one of the experts in the film puts it, chemistry is merely further down a “stream of ideas.”

The DVD also suggests that stones mirror what’s inside ourselves. So, on the one hand, stones have power. And, on the other hand, this power ultimately resides within. Additional areas covered are divination, runes, and Grail legends. Apparently Grail legends can be traced back to emerald cups of power and, possibly, to simple sacred stones.

To top it off, the film touches on the idea that our planet was seeded by life forms that fell to Earth from meteors.

All very far out stuff.

Or is it?

As for production values, director Philip Gardiner makes ample use of dark vignetting, old film effects and cgi. Whether or not one finds these techniques effective would probably depend on where one’s at, artistically and spiritually.

What this film occasionally leaves out in factual detail is compensated by its unusual breadth. To fully enjoy this DVD, I had to lay back, forget the small stuff, and just absorb all it has to offer.

Secret Societies and Sacred Stones is the perfect solution for anyone wanting to learn more about esoterica, alternative histories, spiritual warfare, and the quest for the eternal self.

Special features include unseen footage and comments from the cast of The Stone Movie, also by Gardiner, along with several haunting music videos and trailers.

—MC


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The Dislike of Catholicism: Understanding the Holy in the Catholic Tradition

Jesus le nazaréen by *Katch*


1 – Introduction

2 – Theory and method
3 – Theological reasons
4 – Social and political reasons
5 – Psychological reasons
6 – Philosophical and historical reasons and conclusion

Ask a person on the street the difference between a Catholic, a Protestant, an Evangelical and a Fundamentalist and chances are they won’t have a clue.

Back in the 90s a classmate in religious studies raised an interesting point. He said that researchers should state their personal biases at the outset of a study instead of posing as an objective reporter.

Indeed, the whole idea of objectivity is under siege these days. Any scholar or scientist worth their salt will realize that we cannot escape bias. Even religious people believing they’ve had a revelation from God should pull back and ask if this apparent truth is situated in a particular context that’s right for them or, perhaps, the times.

This much said, I’ll tell just a little bit about myself so you, the reader, can better understand where I’m coming from.

Before my conversion to Catholicism in 2001 I had little interest in organized religion. I spent my childhood summers immersed in the outstanding nature at Georgian Bay. In the early years my parent’s cottage didn’t have an electrical hookup, so we used candles, propane, and a gas-powered generator. And being situated on an island, for most summers I didn’t ride in a car for two months every year. It was a remote, beautiful, place and nature was my religion. In winter I didn’t play organized sports, partly because we skied in Collingwood weekends and partly because I never felt drawn toward playing, say, on a hockey team.

When it came to religion, except for a dimly remembered Sunday school class or two, I was a non-churchgoing kid. Weddings and funerals. That was it.

But I was curious.

Why are we here? How are we here? Where does the universe end? My childhood mind just went that way as I gazed into the awesome stars of the Georgian Bay night sky. And I kept asking those kinds of questions without getting too many answers.

In my late teens it was understood that I’d be going to university. My father paid for the tuition (not too severe back in those days) and I paid for everything else. This meant that I had to get regular summer jobs (from age 16 onward) to cover my rent and living expenses. Intellectually, I gravitated toward psychology and sociology, from Freud and Jung to Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx, J. P. Sartre and Michel Foucault.

During my twenties and thirties I studied East-West philosophy, New Age and non-Christian religions. And in 2001 I ended up a bona fide Catholic. Make that, a progressive bona fide Catholic. Since then, I’ve encountered many critics of Catholicism. Instead of shunning them, however, I’ve talked to them in person and online. And I understand very well why people dislike this religion.

When telling a fellow Catholic about my plans to write this article, she suggested that I entitle it “Why people LIKE Catholicism.” But after some reflection I feel that DISLIKE is better because I’m essentially replying to the critics, and I’m not really trying to convert anyone by putting a positive spin on things. God knows, there are problems with the Catholic Church.

You see, I do think for myself and am not easily fooled. But, despite all the Church’s problems, I still experience the holy within it. And coming from someone who, as a kid, never went to Church and, as a teen, thought that God and the angels were simply Freudian projections, this is remarkable.

Copyright © Michael Clark, 2012.

2 – Theory and method


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Georgian Bay – The 6th Great Lake

Yes… our vacation lasted a little longer than we expected… but we’ve come back with the goods! Here’s a video of our time away. It was great being away from the web. And it’s great to be back.

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