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Abduction (2017) – Review

Title: Abduction
Genre: Science Fiction, Parody, Comedy, Horror, Cult
Production: Onview Films
Directors/Writers: Maurice SmithMol Smith
Stars: Karolina AntosikTessa McGinnKemal Yildirim (…full cast and crew at IMDB)

Abduction is a clever romp into the unknown realms of alien abduction, sexuality, violence and interdimensional rivalry.

Essentially a spoof, I couldn’t help get the feeling that, underneath all the camp, a deeper significance just waits to be discovered.

The film can be taken on several levels. As parody, imagine Rocky Horror Picture Show meets Repo! The Genetic Opera. On another level, Abduction probes the oft unspoken sexual undercurrents in alien abduction lore. In that sense, it’s almost Freudian.

But Abduction doesn’t stop there. Sci-fi fans will appreciate its look at interdimensional affairs. That is, if aliens exist, how might things actually work out there?

The Hive Queen argues with an ET

The story hinges on a hauntingly beautiful Hive Queen who wants to colonize the earth by creating hybrids.

She’s a hybrid herself but imperfect. She can’t have kids. So she does her evil best to create hybrids to take over the planet.

Kemal Yildirim plays a doctor, Asil, who heals abductees with the most unusual treatments. Meanwhile, a government man (Thorson), a psychiatrist (Melissa) and Asil use high tech meds to try to track victims, with comical side effects.

Any more plot summary would be a spoiler. But I will say that Abduction is relatively easy to follow – we’re never left hanging too long – and it does have a nice, trick ending.

The Doctor with Bozena

Okay so I loved it to bits, right?

Well, no film entirely pleases me and Abduction is no exception.

My nitpicky side felt that an outdoor scene with Thorson and Melissa had a slightly rushed dialog. But things level out as the pair move indoors. And as a send-up, a touch of forced dialog is par for the course. Some might find it just adds to the laughs. It certainly does with the Hive Queen, who obviously hams it up.

Abduction also has its fair share of partial nudity and grotesque scenes, the horrific being more in-your-face than the sensual.

I wasn’t too hot on the blood and gore. But I realize this is important to horror fans. I just flick my Vulcan “inner eyelid” whenever something rubs me the wrong way, be it in Abduction, Game of Thrones, whatever.

Thorson, the Doctor and Melissa

The graphics range from intentionally retro (say, 1960s Twilight Zone and Batman) to state-of-the-art blasters, beams and shimmering pod bay doors.

Like the graphics, the soundtrack is a curious mix of old and new. High-end cinematic effects mingle with catchy pop tunes and 8-bit video game sounds.

The ongoing tension between parody and depth along with variable production values keeps this quirky film fresh. Abduction is well the worth the watch, even if you’re not a cult or Indie movie fan. Not constrained by big budget, Hollywood expectations, it’s free to be what it wants to be.

MC

All images © Onview Films UK. Used with permission.

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 Watch The Trailer For A New Sci-Fi Film Scored By Neon Indian’s Alan Palomo (stereogum.com)

 These Layers of Time Were Created by Arranging Photos on Acrylic (petapixel.com)

 If We Live in a Multiverse, Where Are These Worlds Hiding? (livescience.com)

 Ang Lee’s Will Smith-Led ‘Gemini Man’ Gets a 2019 Release Date (slashfilm.com)

 ‘SNL,’ Westworld’ lead Emmy Award nominations with 22 nods (triblive.com)


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Star Wars a modern myth


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Time Travel Novels : Arguably The Most Fascinating Topic

Time dilation in transversal motion. The requi...

Time dilation in transversal motion. The requirement that the speed of light is constant in every inertial reference frame leads to the theory of relativity (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

By Gary J. McCleary

Time travel is arguably the most fascinating topic in all of science fiction. If you are a fan of science fiction consider for a moment your favourite movies, books and episodes of television shows.

Which were the best episodes of Star Trek for example in all of its incarnations? Which episode would you consider to be the absolute best out of all the series? Think about your favourite movies and decide which is best out of straight adventure and exploration, fighting off monsters or the mind bending stories involving time travel.

There are two directions of possible travel, namely into the future or into the past. The truth is that travel into the future is not a problem and can be accomplished in a number of ways some of which are practical and others which are theoretically possible given future advances in technology.

We have…

Time dilation as proposed by Einstein as velocity approaches the speed of light. This has been verified even here on Earth by clocks travelling in high speed flight or in orbit and also by observing cosmic rays.

Suspended animation by freezing or even hibernation which the bears regularly do.

The normal aging process which takes our consciousness into the future at the steady rate of one second per second.

Now factor in things like black holes, wormholes, folded space, string theory etc and we have many possibilities to consider.

time travel using parallel universe.

time travel using parallel universe. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Now time travel into the past looks on the surface to be impossible because of the many paradoxes that it implies. However the laws of Physics are symmetrical and there is actually nothing in the laws that prohibits backward travel in time.

It is the exploring of the paradoxes that breathes life into the whole concept of time travel. The best known one is of course any variation on the so called ‘grandfather paradox’. This is where the time traveller goes back in time and murders his own grandfather before he gets around to fathering his father which means that the time traveller was never born which means that he never went back in time which means that he never killed his grandfather which means…well you get the picture.

In my Time Travel Novels I have explored many variations on this paradox and others. One explanation is that there are an infinite number of universes so every possibility is allowed for. Another is the theory that an event becomes its own cause so that whatever the time traveller does in the past it was meant to happen in the first place in order to set his existence in motion.

Think about any time travel story that you have ever seen or read and you will realise that they all involve a giant circle which appears to close on itself. The trick is in trying to pick where the break is in the circle.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/new-age-articles/time-travel-novels-arguably-the-most-fascinating-topic-7134323.html

About the Author

I had a good childhood as childhoods go. I didn’t like school very much and yet I went on to become a high school Maths teacher. After five years of that I returned to university to finish my own full-time study in Applied Mathematics IV. Around this time I began a part-time career as a lecturer in Engineering Studies at the University of Western Sydney.

The groundwork for the person that I am today was always there though because I have always had a love for anything to do with science fiction. After Life Novels


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Review – The Extraordinary Voyages of Jules Verne (DVD)

This film tells of the intriguing life of Jules Verne (1828-1905), from his early days of being beaten by his father to rejecting his family’s approach to religion and entering into a world of magic and secret societies.

Philip Gardiner observes that Verne’s novels are in large part allegorical. With the help of the influential French publisher Pierre-Jules Hetzel, Verne’s literary output not only predicts some of the realities of 20th and 21st century life but, perhaps more importantly, depicts the inner journey of the archetypal hero.

The idea of the hero’s symbolic death and resurrection is familiar today. The hero motif has been influential in literature and literary criticism and roundly discussed by the likes of Joseph Campbell, Carl Jung, Otto Rank and Lord Raglan (4th Baron), among many others.

However, Gardiner maintains that the complex social and religious backdrop to Verne’s era necessitated secrecy and symbolism when Verne was alluding to the heroic and essentially alchemical quest for immortality.

And when you think about it, Verne’s novels fit perfectly within a Jungian or Campbellian framework. From Journey to the Centre of the Earth to 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, it’s not too difficult to see these fictional works as portraying an underworld journey into the unusual forces that alternately endanger or enhance awareness of the essential self.

This well-researched DVD doesn’t require familiarity with Verne’s novels. And those interested in 19th-century European history and the confluence of wisdom, literature and science should find it extremely worthwhile.

–MC


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Review – BSG Razor

Battlestar Galactica: Razor – Trailer / Preview

Sci-fi fans of Battlestar Galactica Re-Imagined should enjoy this two-hour movie. Read the review at michaelwclark.com.